For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights

Ernest C. Withers, I Am A Man, Sanitation Workers Assemble Outside Clayborn Temple, Memphis, TN, 1968 © Ernest C. Withers. Courtesy Panopticon Gallery, Boston, MA

Visual Arts
November 15 – March 10
For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights, organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture in partnership with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture and curated by Maurice Berger, is the first comprehensive museum exhibition to explore the historic role played by visual images in shaping, influencing, and transforming the fight for civil rights in the United States. Through a host of media—including photographs, television and film, magazines, newspapers, posters, books, and pamphlets—the project explores fight for racial equality and justice from the late-1940s to the mid-1970s. For All the World to See includes a traveling exhibition, website, online film festival, and richly illustrated companion book.

Read a review of the exhibition by Lionel Foster for the Baltimore Sun: “Using images to change history”

Listen to Maurice Bergers’ interview for NPR’s Maryland Morning about the exhibition: “Viewing the Civil Rights Movement Through a New Lens”

An opening reception will be held on Thursday, November 15 from 5 to 7:30 pm.

Admission to the exhibition is free. The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and is located in the Fine Arts Building. The gallery will hold additional hours for the closing of For All the World to See on Sunday, March 10, from 10 am until 5 pm. For more information call 410-455-3188.

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