Social Sciences Forum

Deborah Carr: Golden Years? – Social Inequalities in Later Life

Thanks to advances in technology, medicine, Social Security, and Medicare, old age for many Americans is characterized by comfortable retirement, good health, and fulfilling relationships. But there are also millions of people over 65 who struggle with poverty, chronic illness, unsafe housing, social isolation, and mistreatment by their caretakers. Deborah Carr will discuss her new …

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Kelly Dittmar: Measuring Electoral Success – Gender and Intersectional Dynamics in Political Campaigns

The electoral gains for women in the 2018 election were notable, but that numeric progress was not felt by all women nor did it yield gender parity in American politics. Beyond the numbers, measuring success in U.S. elections means considering the ways in which gender and intersectional dynamics that have created obstacles to women candidates …

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Candace S. Brown: The Motivation to Exercise in Age

It is known that maintaining physical function, through activity, is one key to successful aging. Brown will present her mixed-methodology research, grounded in both sociological and psychological theories of motivation, which explores the relationship between aging and the motivation to exercise. Her presentation will highlight the role that motivation plays in maintaining an active lifestyle …

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Gail Elizabeth Wyatt: “Getting in Your Pants” – Confronting the Lasting Effects of Racism, Sexism and the Historical Void in HIV Research and Treatment

This presentation will demonstrate how old myths and assumptions about behavior can derail prevention efforts to reduce the rates of HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Infections and unplanned pregnancies, especially in people of color. Based on over four decades of NIH funded research, Wyatt will discuss strategies that should be adapted to create prevention programs that are …

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Tracey Osborne: Engaged Scholarship for Climate Justice — Harnessing the Power of Colleges and Universities in the Age of the Anthropocene

Climate change is an urgent social and ecological crisis that requires immediate and radical action. While governments and the private sector have made some important advances toward climate change mitigation, their actions remain insufficient. Colleges and universities are playing an increasingly important role in climate action from conducting critical and engaged research and leading climate …

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Richard Bell: The Reverse Underground Railroad – Slavery and Kidnapping in Pre-Civil War America

Bell will discuss his new book, Stolen, a gripping and true story about five boys who were kidnapped in the North and smuggled into slavery in the Deep South—and their daring attempt to escape and bring their captors to justice. Richard Bell is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. …

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Jackson Katz: Men’s Leadership in Gender-Based Violence Prevention

Jackson Katz, founder and director of Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) Strategies, speaks on “Men’s Leadership in Gender-Based Violence Prevention Is a Social Justice Imperative.” Focusing on a variety of sectors and settings, such as education, sports, media, politics, clergy, and human services, Katz explores ways in which male leaders can address issues of sexual assault …

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Sheila Olmstead: The Economic Costs of Water Pollution

Sheila Olmstead, Professor of Public Affairs, LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin, will speak on “The Economic Costs of Water Pollution.” Americans consistently list water quality among their most significant environmental concerns. However, analysis of ambient water quality regulations in the US suggests that such regulations have unfavorable benefit-cost ratios, particularly …

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Birthright Citizens

Social Sciences Forum — Low Lecture “Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America” Martha Jones, Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University Wednesday, April 10, 4 p.m. Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery    Martha Jones will discuss her recent book, Birthright Citizens, which …

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